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IBD’s 10 Secrets To Success

Another nugget shared by Coach Gary Colson from his friend George Raveling.  Thanks coaches.

Investor’s Business Daily has spent years analyzing leaders and successful people in all walks of life.

Most have 10 traits that, when combined, can turn dreams into reality.

1            HOW YOU THINK IS EVERYTHING:

Always be positive. Think success, not failure. Beware of a negative environment.

2            DECIDE UPON YOUR TRUE DREAMS AND GOALS:

Write down your specific goals and develop a plan to reach them.

3            TAKE ACTION:

Goals are nothing without action. Don’t be afraid to get started. Just do it.

4            NEVER STOP LEARNING:

Go back to school or read books. Get training and acquire skills.

5            BE PERSISTENT AND WORK HARD:

Success is a marathon, not a sprint. Never give up.

6            LEARN TO ANALYZE DETAILS:

Get all the facts, all the input. Learn from your mistakes.

7            FOCUS YOUR TIME AND MONEY:

Don’t let other people or things distract you.

8            DON’T BE AFRAID TO INNOVATE; BE DIFFERENT:

Following the herd is a sure way to mediocrity.

9            DEAL AND COMMUNICATE WITH PEOPLE EFFECTIVELY:

No person is an island. Learn to understand and motivate others.

10            BE HONEST AND DEPENDABLE; TAKE RESPONSIBILITY:

Otherwise, Nos. 1-9 won’t matter.

DON’T BE AFRAID TO INNOVATE; BE DIFFERENT

Target New Approaches

By Cord Cooper

Firms eyeing new markets could learn from the Missouri Partnership — a public-private sector alliance luring business to the Show-Me State.

Among key lessons:

• Define. Marketing is one of the partnership’s key goals — “changing the image of Missouri, not just as a place to do business but a place to live and grow,” Chris Chung, CEO of the Missouri Partnership, told IBD. “It’s a state that’s suffered from an absence of identity, and our goal is to define it in positive ways — in everything from print to electronic media.”

His goal? “Tightly target our audience to specific firms and industries. In addition to media ads, we get on the ground with face-to-face contact — building relationships with leading execs. That means exhibiting at select trade shows, sponsoring conferences within key industries, and hosting hospitality events.” He calls his two-winged approach “the air game and the ground game. The air game is paid media; the ground game is building face-to-face relationships.”

• Lay it out. He targets markets “where there’s a strong concentration of company headquarters — with execs in a position to channel expansion money,” he said. He then hits “mainstream business publications in those markets. We advertise in airline magazines as well as local metro business journals.”

• Align. Chung zeros in on growth industries — from renewable energy to biotechnology. The latter “includes veterinary sciences and animal health, targeting the farming and recreational industries — big markets in the western part of the state,” he said. Another example: the human medicine sector, highlighting industry near St. Louis. “We’re also looking to boost agricultural production on limited land — maximizing output.”

• Raise the profile. When possible, he recruits Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon as a “chief salesperson here and overseas,” he said. “A state governor can gain entry into foreign markets that other officials can’t. An appearance when U.S. execs visit the state is also influential.”

• Get out front. Some states confine business recruitment to the public sector. “Our private-public sector partnership opens more opportunities, with more creative approaches,” Chung said. The partnership’s a top state marketing effort because of consistency in advertising and culling business relationships. “That keeps us in the forefront of targeted markets.”

• Think long term. With budget challenges, some states have cut back on marketing. Yet their budgets depend on new business, leading to more workers paying for goods and services.

“Recruiting business is vital,” Chung said. “Right now we have 80 projects in some stage of consideration by key firms and industries.”

• Sell it. When negotiating with firms, “we stay in the game longer — and get more deals — because we have a strong sales force,” said Chung. “They position Missouri as an ideal solution.”

• Embrace. Thanks to Missouri’s private-sector involvement, “the range of markets and contacts is wider, and the results are greater,” said David Kerr, board member of the Hawthorn Foundation, a private-public sector association that founded the partnership.

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